People

Netta Cohen

Netta Cohen

Researcher

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Netta Cohen graduated from the Tel Aviv University in the department of History in 2009 and has obtained her M.A. degree in History (summa cum laude) from the Tel Aviv University in 2013. Her thesis project examined the environmental and climatic perceptions of Jewish architects in Palestine between the years 1909-1948 and the ways these informed their professional practice. Netta is interested in environmental history, colonial history and history of expertise and has a particular interest in the transfer of cultural knowledge and identities from Central Europe, and especially Germany, to Palestine (later the state of Israel) during the late 19th century and the 20th century.

 

Research Project

As a fellow of the Franz Rosenzweig Minerva Research Center at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem she is currently participating in two of the center's projects. Since January 2014 Netta is taking part in the research and arrangement of Heinrich Mendelssohn's estate in the Historical Archives of Tel Aviv University, a collaborative project of the German Literature Archive in Marbach (Germany) and the Rosenzweig Minerva Research Center. Fascinated by the archival material found in Mendelssohn's collection, she has begun to examine together with Ray Schrire the multifold relations between environmental and national ideas in Israel during 1950-1970. The results of this investigation were presented in the conference "History of Environmental Movements and Development of Environmental Thought" held in Zagreb (Croatia) in September 2014.

In addition Netta is also coordinating the project Cultural Property and Restitution Documentation after 1945, a collaborative project of I-core/Daat Hamacom and the Rosenzweig Minerva Research Center. The main goal of this project is to enhance accessibility and publicity of the variety of primary sources concerning Jewish cultural property which are located in Israeli archives, setting the ground for a more comprehensive and profound research.

 

Selected Publications

- Pride and Prejudice: The Israeli Architecture in the Eyes of Public Opinion and the Planning Authority 1948-1967, in: A-foria, ed. by Jeremy Hoffmann & Zvi Elhyani), Tel Aviv, forthcoming.

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Ofra Amihay

Shalem Coulbiala

Research Fellow 2002-3

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Shalem Coulbiala was a Post Doctoral Visiting Research Fellow at the Rosenzweig Center from October 2002 to June 2003. His research topic was "Nietzsche and Levinas".

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Czakai

Johannes Czakai

Research Fellow 2018-19
Visiting Research Fellows 2020-21
johannes.czakai@fu-berlin.de
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Johannes Czakai is a visiting postdoctoral research fellow at the Franz Rosenzweig Minerva Research Center. His main research interests are German- and Polish-Jewish history, especially of the early modern period, Jewish names, cemeteries and epigraphy, genealogy and art.

Johannes studied history and Jewish Studies in Berlin, Potsdam, and Kraków. After working as a freelance archival researcher, he was research assistant at the Selma Stern Center for Jewish Studies Berlin-Brandenburg (ZJS) from 2015 through 2018 and a research fellow at the Franz Rosenzweig Minerva Research Center (2018-2019). 

In 2020 he finished his PhD thesis at Free University Berlin (summa cum laude) on the adoption of German family names by the Jews in Habsburg Galicia and Bukovina. Starting point of Johannes’s PhD thesis, which is currently being turned into a book, is the notorious adoption of permanent, German-sounding family names by the Jews in the east of the Habsburg monarchy – names like Ringelblum (marigold), Streisand (grit), or Affengesicht (monkey face). This step was a multifaceted process with several goals and several, partially contradictory steps. In analyzing the implications of this process, Johannes is able to shed new light onto Habsburg imperial rule in newly annexed Galicia. Accordingly, his work examines the adoption of permanent names in the context of governmental surveillance techniques. Moreover, because of the German appearance of the newly adopted names, the process is often portrayed as means of a forced ‘Germanization’. In scrutinizing this blurry term, Johannes analyzes the process from the perspective of Austrian Enlightenment and the discourse on Yiddish. His final focus is Jewish agency. By asking if these names were chosen or assigned, he questions the outdated depiction of Galician Jews as helpless victims of anti-Semitic clerks. Based on newly found archival material from Austria, Poland, Ukraine and Israel, he paints a colorful picture of Jewish life in Galicia at the end of the 18th century.

Current Project

Together with Kathrin Wittler (also a Rosenzweig alumna), Johannes is currently working on the research project “Joel Jacoby: A Renegade in the Era of Emancipation and Restoration.” This project, funded by the Gerda Henkel Stiftung, examines the life and work of the Prussian writer and spy Joel Jacoby (1811-1863), which was shaped by several shifts of conviction, affiliation and faith. Born into a Jewish family and originally a sympathizer with liberal ideas, Jacoby spectacularly changed sides, becoming a spy of the Prussian police and publicly converting to Catholicism. The project aims to shed new light on the political and religious tensions which marked German-Jewish history in the first half of the 19th century.

 

 

 

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Julia Anspach

Katarzyna Czerwonogora

Research Fellow

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Katarzyna Czerwonogora was a Doctoral Research Fellow at the Rosenzweig Center. Her dissertation was titled "Local and International Mobilization of Zionist Women at the Turn of the Nineteenth and Twentieth Century in Poland and Germany".

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Julia Anspach

Anat Danziger

Research Fellow 2012

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Anat Danziger was a Doctoral Research Fellow at the Rosenzweig Center in 2012. Her dissertation project was titled "The Letter Killeth: Allegory and the Suffering Body in Franz Kafka and S.Y. Agnon".

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Sonja Dickow

Sonja Dickow

Researcher

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Sonja Dickow is a PhD candidate at Hamburg University and has been a scholarship holder at the Ernst Ludwig Ehrlich Studienwerk since April 2014. She worked as an academic research assistant at Hamburg University and its Walter A. Berendsohn Forschungsstelle für deutsche Exilliteratur from August 2013 until February 2014. Sonja Dickow studied German literature in Hamburg from 2010 until 2013. She received her B.A. in German Language and Literature and Cultural Studies in 2010. Her comparative dissertation project focuses on poetics of ‘diaspora’ in contemporary Jewish literature. Sonja Dickow worked at the Central Archives for the History of the Jewish People in Jerusalem, arranging the private collection of Cheskel Zwi Kloetzel and his family in July and August 2013.

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