People

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Yoel Regev

Research Fellow 2007

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Yoel Regev was a Research Fellow at the Rosenzweig Center from January to June 2007.

His research topic was titled "The concept of knowledge in the philosophy of Deleuze".

 

 

 

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Maria Rethelyi

Research Fellow 2006-7

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 Maria Rethelyi was a Research Fellow at the Rosenzweig Center from October 2006 to June 2007.

Her research topic was "The formation of Hungarian-Jewish Identity and its connection to Oriental Studies".

 

 

 

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Larisa Reznik

Research Fellow 2012
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Larisa Reznik was a fellow at the Franz Rosenzweig Minerva Research Center from January to June 2012. She worked on the relationship between theology and politics in the work of Franz Rosenzweig and Theodor W. Adorno.
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Dr. Oren Roman

Research Fellow 2015-16

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CV

Oren Roman is a post-doctoral fellow at the Rosenzweig Minerva Research Center at the Hebrew University in Jerusalem. He received his Ph.D from the Hebrew University in 2015 after completing a thesis on "The Old-Yiddish Epics on the Book of Joshua and the Book of Judges". His BA and MA are from the Yiddish Department at the Hebrew University, and he also studied at the the department of Ältere deutsche Sprache und Literatur at Humboldt Universität zu Berlin in 2005. In 2012 he participated in the European Seminar for Advanced Jewish Studies at Oxford University.

Research Project

The project deals with the retelling and the transmission of the story of the Binding of Isaac (עקדת יצחק) during the Middle Ages and the Early Modern Era among Jews from the German speaking realm. The research will concentrate on Hebrew piyutim and texts in the vernacular, generally referred to as West Yiddish. Although the corpus of Hebrew piyutim as well as the parallel corpus of poems and prose texts in West Yiddish, have each been the subject of extensive research, a close comparison of the two bodies of literature is still desired. The current research project aims to highlight the unique aspects documented in the vernacular texts, such as popular beliefs regarding death, perception of family, Jewish mythology, the traumatic memory of the crusades, influence of co-territorial Christian culture, and more. Such aspects and “popular” voices are often absent from Hebrew texts which were generally written by men from the rabbinic elite and targeted a similar audience.

Selected Publications

- “Be-nign Shmuel-bukh: On the Melody or Melodies Mentioned in Old-Yiddish Epics”, Aschkenas - Zeitschrift für Geschichte und Kultur der Juden 25,1 (2015), pp. 145–160.

- “The Mighty One of Israel: On Epics in Old-Yiddish” [Hebrew], Zmanim: A Historical Quarterly, 125 (2014), pp. 18–25.

- “The Song of Deborah in Sefer Shoftim (Mantua 1564)”, Amsterdam Yiddish Symposium, 3 (2009), pp. 27–44.

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Ori Rotlevy

Dr. Ori Rotlevy

Research Fellow 2017-18

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CV

Ori Rotlevy investigates the history of modern philosophy, focusing on problems of method, subjectivity, and the idea-phenomena relation in a Kantian framework, widely construed. He received his PhD from Tel Aviv University with a dissertation titled, "Kant’s Orientation and Benjamin’s Detour: Two Modes of Relating to the Idea". By following Kant’s use of spatial figures of thought, he provided a novel account of the problematics of ideas in critical philosophy, relating it to problems of subjectivity and method in Neo-Kantian thought. On this background, he presented Walter Benjamin’s early writings as a sharp critique on the subject-based directedness of thought found in the regulative use of ideas in Kant. This culminates in the alternative of a digressive method, aimed to transcend the limits of subject-object relations. He was a postdoctoral fellow at  FU Berlin (Minerva Stiftung), at Tel Aviv University, and at the Hebrew University (Lady Davis Foundation), and a member of three research groups in Minerva Humanities Center in Tel Aviv: "The politics and philosophy of space", "Migrating knowledge", and "Tradition: Canon, Transmission and Critique". He co-edited a volume of the historical quarterly Zmanim on modern urban space, and has published several articles on Benjamin, Kant, as well as on the transmission of knowledge from Islam to the west in the Middle Ages. Ori taught courses in political thought and in the history of philosophy in Tel Aviv University, and in IDC Herzliya. His current project is titled "Making Tradition Explicit: Thomas Kuhn and Walter Benjamin".

 

Research Project

Ori's current project juxtaposes Thomas Kuhn and Walter Benjamin in a study of tradition, disruption, and critique. These two very different thinkers share with  H. G. Gadamer the understanding of tradition as an implicit condition of human activity. However, while Gadamer sees the explication of tradition in hermeneutics as "fusing" the horizons of the past and the present, Kuhn and Benjamin observe in their respective fields of study - science and modern culture - an opposite effect. The explication, articulation or presentation of implicit traditions is destabilizing and disruptive. From this perspective, Ori examines the corpus of each thinker, revisiting central concepts such as "paradigm shift" and the "tradition of the oppressed", in order to develop the epistemological and political implications of making traditions explicit. On the backdrop of recent literature, which reads each of the thinkers as unfolding Kantian problematics concerning the relations between philosophy and history, Ori suggests rethinking the divide between the two great philosophical traditions of our time, the analytic and the continental, through the very concept of tradition.

 

Selected Publications

 

- "Transcendental Ideas as Schemata: Reason's Role in Empirical Cognition", In Natur und Freiheit: Akten des XII Internationalen Kant-Kongresses, edited by Violetta Waibel and Margit Ruffing, (Berlin: de Gruyter), forthcoming in 2018.

- "Knowledge in 'Transmit' or in 'Migration'? The effect of Muslim Scholasticism on the West in The Rise of Colleges", In Migration of Knowledge: Collected Essays [Hebrew], edited by Rivka Feldhay and Gal Hertz, (Tel Aviv: Resling), forthcoming in 2018.

- "Presentation as Indirection, Indirection as Schooling: The Two Aspects of Benjamin's Scholastic Method", Continental Philosophy Review. Advance Online Publication: 18/12/2016, doi: 10.1007/s11007-016- 9404-2

- "From Flânerie to Miniature: Benjamin’s Arcades as an Epistemological Key to the City", Zmanim 119, August 2012 [Hebrew]

 

 

 

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Dr. Miriam Ruerup

Research Fellow 2001-2

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Miriam Ruerup was a Research Fellow at the Rosenzweig Center from October 2001 to June 2002.

Her research topic was "Between Accomodation and Self-affirmation - Jewish student fraternities from the Kaiserreich to World War II".

 

 

 

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Inka

Dr. Inka Sauter

Research Fellow 2019-20
sauter@dubnow.de

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CV

Before joining the Franz Rosenzweig Minerva Research Center Inka Sauter was a PhD-student at the Leibniz Institute for Jewish History and Culture – Simon Dubnow in Leipzig, Germany. She studied Philosophy, History, and Mathematics at Leipzig University and received her M.A. in 2011. In summer and fall 2012, she was a visiting scholar at the Rosenzweig Center holding a scholarship from the Saxonian State Ministry for Science and Culture. From April 2014 to March 2017, her research was supported by a doctoral scholarship from the Ernst Ludwig Ehrlich Studienwerk. From July to December 2018, she was a research fellow at the Collaborative Research Centre 948: “Heroes – Heroizations – Heroisms” in Freiburg, Germany. In July 2019 she submitted her dissertation entitled “Philosophy of Revelation and History. On the Jewish Crisis of Historicism”. It deals with Franz Rosenzweig’s thought concerning history and revelation, as reflected in his The Star of Redemption. In preparation of her postdoc project she carried out archival research at the German Literature Archive in Marbach, funded by a fellowship of the project “German-Jewish Knowledge and Cultural Transfer, 1918–1948” in March and April 2019.

 

 

Research Project

 

Inka’s research project is dedicated to the translation of the Hebrew bible by Martin Buber and Franz Rosenzweig. It focuses not so much on the translation as such, but rather questions the use of the German language. Buber and Rosenzweig began translating the bible in the mid-1920s and in the process developed a philosophy of language and speech as part of the effort to preserve and guarantee the authenticity of the holy text – a philosophy of authenticity that had its roots, however, in the concept of national spirits. Hence, they referred to the connection of “Deutschtum” and “Judentum” in the field of philology itself. The connection between the two terms, which first appeared around 1880, constitutes the main focus of the project. In particular, the word “Deutschtum”, which could be translated as “Germandom”, was a frequently used term in the 1920s yet had by no means a clear and unambiguous definition. This wide-spread use can be regarded as a sign of change in historical semantics, which becomes evident in the juxtaposition of the suffixes “-ismus” (“-ism”) and “-tum” (“-dom”) in the fin de siècle. It is precisely this change in historical semantics that the postdoc project examines by looking at the language used by Buber and Rosenzweig in their translation of the Hebrew bible.

 

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Jan Schenkenberger

Research Fellow 2008-9
j.schenkenberger@gmail.com
Fritz-Reuter-Str. 10 23564 Lübeck Germany

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Current Affiliation or Position: Staffer for a German Member of Parliament

Jan Schenkenberger was a Research Fellow at the Rosenzweig Center from October 2008 to June 2009. His research topic was "Critique of Totalitarianism: Karl Löwith and the School of Heidegger".

 

 

 

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Sebastian Schirrmeister

Research Fellow 2014
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Current Affiliation or Position: Moritz Stern Postdoctoral Research Fellow for Modern Jewish Studies; Lichtenberg-Kolleg (University of Göttingen).
Current Research Project: Legitimate Passions. Reflections on Revenge (Fantasies) in Modern Jewish Writing.

Sebastian Schirrmeister was a Visiting Research Fellow at the Franz Rosenzweig Minerva Research Center from January to August 2014. His research topic was "Encounter on foreign soil. German and Hebrew prose in Palestine and Israel after 1933".

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Michael J. Schlie

Research Fellow 2010
mschlie76@gmail.com

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Current Affiliation or Position: Hilb Group of New Jersey.

Michael J. Schlie was a Doctoral Research Fellow at the Rosenzweig Center from January to September 2010.

His research topic was titled "Franz Rosenzweig and the End of Political Theology".

He defended his dissertation in August 2011 and was awarded the ACLS-Carnegie Mellon Dissertation Fellowship for 2012.

 

 

 

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